Words in Deep Blue, by Cath Crowley

I received this ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. A big thank you to the publisher for accepting my request.

31952703.jpgEven since her brother drowned, Rachel Sweetie has lost her will to live. Everything seems meaningless without him. The fact that for the past three years she has moved away from her hometown and the people in it doesn’t help either. Or that Henry, her best friend, still hasn’t apologised for that night. But it’s not like she cares or likes him anymore right? At least that’s what she says to herself when she moves back to town and has to work with him in his second-hand bookstore.


This has been a very highly anticipated release of mine, I mean blurbed by Jennifer Niven??? Sign me in. Unfortunately, it did not live up to the hype. *sigh*

It was not awful, just not what I expected. For starters, the writing style was not for me. I was 20% through the book and I still hadn’t figured out the timeline, or if her brother was older or younger, or other general things about the novel. I was just reading things that seemed to not flow as much as I would have liked.

Another thing I did not like was Henry. My god Henry was making me so ANGRY everytime I read his point of view. This obsession with that Amy girl, ugh, not good guys. As far as Rachel is concerned, I feel kinda…. meh? I don’t like her, but I don’t dislike her either. Most of the time the scenes taking place in this book did not feel realistic and I couldn’t relate, I think that’s my main problem with this.

Now moving on to the things I did like. GEORGE. George is a queen. She is smart, sassy and knows what she wants. I loved her dynamic with Martin and the jokes between them made me snort with laughter every now and then. I also liked the way this deals with loss. I don’t want to spoil anything but it goes through the stages of loss pretty accurately. Denial, holding on to the person etc.

Lastly I cannot NOT give points to Words in Deep Blue for what a major role the bookshop and books in general played.

“Words matter, in fact. They’re not pointless, as you’ve suggested. If they were pointless, then they couldn’t start revolutions and they wouldn’t change history.”


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